This dive is on the left-hand point when you are leaving Schooner Cove marina. There is probably shore access, but I went in a boat.  In the shallows (10-20 feet deep), there are a few large boulders scattered over a flat rock bottom. There is a bit more invertebrate life here than at the other dives I did in the area. Patches of some kind of colonial tunicate are on the rocks here and there. Cup corals live in the protected areas under and between boulders. Groups of tiny perch swam around the small clusters of bull kelp. Visibility was around 20 feet here (mid August). I swam deeper down a rubble slope which eventually turned to silty sand. As at the other local dives I did, the visibility became worse as I passed below the thermocline at 20 feet. I could see  about 6-10 feet here, partly because of the same swarms of tiny shrimp that I saw on the other dives. This sandy bottom was scattered with thousands of little nudibranchs, some laying eggs. As I went deeper, The bottom turned into a sloping rock wall that I followed down to 100 feet (although the wall continued to go down deeper). I'd estimate that this wall is about 200 meters from shore. The visibility cleared up at a depth of 80 feet and I could see about 30-40 feet around me. I saw lots of feather stars, snakelock (crimson) anemones, and boot sponges. A grunt sculpin was living in one of the sponges. There was a boulder covered with zoanthids. A dogfish shark swam by above me. I ascended back to the shallower depths and saw an Irish lord between two boulders. I was warned about current around this site, but I didn't feel any.
TUNICATES ON ROCK
NUDIBRANCH
PLUMOSE ANEMONE, FEATHER STAR ON WALL
PERCH AND BULL KELP
CRIMSON ANEMONES ON WALL
SUNFLOWER STAR IN SHALLOWS
ANEMONE
FEATHER STAR AND CLOUD OF SHRIMP ON WALL
SCULPIN IN TUNICATE COLONY
BULL KELP AND PERCH
BRITTLE STAR
NUDIBRANCH
ANEMONE
LEATHER STAR IN SHALLOWS
PURPLE SEASTAR IN SHALLOWS
The point